Library Search Results for Truancy

Notes from the Field: Newton County, GA

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This profile describes the development of the Truancy Intervention Board in+

Newton County, GA. This Board aims to divert youth away from the formal court process by addressing problems of truancy and educational neglect outside the courtroom, with the support of invested community stakeholders. The profile includes a summary of the county’s planning process, an overview of monitoring strategies, a snapshot of general program outcomes, and reflections from those in the reform movement.
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American Indian/Alaska Native Youth & Status Offense Disparities: A Call For Tribal Initiatives, Coordination & Federal Funding

Author:Coalition for Juvenile Justice & Tribal Law and Policy Institute

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) young people+

are almost twice as likely to be petitioned to state court for skipping school, violating liquor laws, and engaging in other behaviors that are only illegal because of their age (often known as status offenses). Once involved with the state court system, they are less likely to be placed on probation and experience higher rates of detention and residential placements. This brief looks at the disparities faced in the state system by AI/AN youth who are charged with status offenses, the ability of both state and tribal systems to respond to status offenses, and federal funding levels to support efforts to better serve these youth.
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IACP National Summit Report: Law Enforcement’s Leadership Role in Juvenile Justice Reform

Author:Anna Bahney, Ryan Daugirda, John Firman, Aviva Kurash, and Kate Rhudy

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This report was produced as a result of the National Summit+

on Law Enforcement Leadership in Juvenile Justice, a two-year collaboration between the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and the MacArthur Foundation which sought to engage law enforcement leaders at the executive level on what makes a fair and effective juvenile justice system. It highlights successful reforms by various law enforcement leaders and their agencies and produces a set of actionable recommendations for practice and policy for others to learn from. Page 39 highlights community-based and family-focused strategies enacted in Louisiana and Georgia to provide support services to truant youth who would otherwise be referred to juvenile and family courts.
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Juvenile Court Statistics 2011

Author:Sarah Hockenberry, Charles Puzzanchera

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This report was developed by the National Center for Juvenile+

Justice (NCJJ) and captures juvenile delinquency and juvenile status offense cases petitioned to juvenile court in 2011.
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Truancy Interventions: A Review of the Research Literature

Author:Richard D. Sutphen, Janet P. Ford, and Chris Flaherty

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2010

Abstract:This article offers a review of literature published between 1990+

and 2007 on 16 evaluative studies of truancy interventions. Each study differed in sample sizes, types of intervention, and definitions of truancy. The authors present the six interventions they find most effective and promising, including community partnerships and family-oriented activities.
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Scared Smart or Bored Straight? Testing Deterrence Logic in an Evaluation of Police-led Truancy Intervention

Author:Gordon Bazemore, Jeanne B. Stinchcomb, and Leslie A. Leip

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2004

Abstract:This paper provides an evaluation of a truancy intervention effort+

in a southeastern county in the U.S. The initiative was a collaboration between the local sheriff's department, social service agencies, the prosecutor's office, and the school board, and called for officers to take truant students to a central Truancy Unit and for social service professionals to make referrals to appropriate services. The data indicate that this  truancy intervention had no impact on future delinquency, and although it may have improved attendance rates in the short-term, the program might have done more harm than good in the long run. The authors conclude that deterrence-focused intervention strategies that are operated using a centralized approach have little positive value in the long-term.      
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School Truancy: A Case Study of a Successful Truancy Reduction Model in the Public Schools

Author:Lorenzo A. Trujillo

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2006

Abstract:This study outlines a school-based Truancy Reduction Program (TRP) that was+

originally implemented in Colorado's Adams County School District 14 in 1999. Truancy is a serious issue in the state of Colorado, where over 70,000 students are out of school every day and over 90%  of youth detained for delinquent acts have a history of truancy. TRP offers truant students and their families a voluntary alternative to court through interventions such as tutoring, group and peer counseling, daily monitoring of homework completion, and drug and alcohol testing. This program has saved the county hundreds of thousands of dollars annually as well as drastically improved the attendance rate for students of all ages.
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Truancy Prosecutions of Students and the Right [to] Education

Author:Dean Hill Rivkin

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2011

Abstract:Despite the prevalence of intervention efforts in response to truancy,+

it is unclear how successful these programs are given that truancy still poses a serious problem nationwide and the number truancy petitions filed in juvenile courts is on the rise. There is no firm consensus on what an effective, evidence-based, replicable truancy reduction project looks like, and the tendency to prosecute students for truancy often has harmful outcomes – including incarceration and mental health consequences. This article emphasizes the importance of decriminalizing truancy and reforming the education system in order to reduce the number of chronically truant youth and to help them succeed academically. The article argues that schools must develop individualized comprehensive plans for truant youth before they can be permitted to file truancy petitions against these students, claiming that doing so furthers a student’s “the right to learn.”
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A Novel, Intensive Home Visiting Intervention for Runaway, Sexually Exploited Girls

Author:Laurel D. Edinburgh and Elizabeth M. Saewyc

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2009

Abstract:This study outlines a home-visiting intervention, the Runaway Intervention Program+

(RIP), initiated in 2003 for runaway girls aged 10-14 who had experienced sexual assault. Integral to this program were advanced practice nurses (APNs), who provided home and school visits as well as case management.  The girls also had access to a therapeutic empowerment group and immediate health care and instruction through the program. The program focused on fostering resilience by helping to reconnect the girls to their schools and other supportive environments, and goals for the girls included no longer running away, regular school attendance, and improved health-related decision-making. The study concludes that such community-based and client-focused interventions are often very effective at reducing risk behaviors and addressing the complex health needs of vulnerable runaway youth.
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Addressing Truancy and Other Status Offenses: Guidance for Education Professionals and Systems

Author:Coalition for Juvenile Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This article provides policy guidance regarding truancy cases, with a+

particular focus on the need for early identification and intervention in order to avoid involvement in the juvenile justice system. Truancy has been shown to be a significant risk factor for future adult criminality, drug use, and other serious problems; for this reason, the Coalition for Juvenile Justice’s National Standards for the Care of Youth Charged with Status Offenses – also available in this library – offers implementable standards for education and other service professionals who work with truant and at-risk youth. The article also highlights a 2010 reform effort in Clayton County, Georgia led by Honorable Steven Teske with the aim of diverting truant youth from the court system.
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