Library Search Results for Running away

Notes from the Field: Gloucester Township, NJ

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This profile describes the development of Gloucester Township Police Department's network of community-based+

responses to youth delinquency and status offenses. The profile includes a summary of the county’s planning process, an overview of existing programs, a snapshot of general outcomes, and reflections from those in the reform movement.
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Running Away: Finding Solutions that Work for Youth and their Communities

Author:Coalition for Juvenile Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This issue brief by the Coalition for Juvenile Justice provides+

a comprehensive overview of status offense cases involving young people who run away from home and identifies ways for communities to address this problem. Given that this type of status offense case is the most likely to involve detention, the brief makes a variety of recommendations focused on alternatives to detention, prevention, diversion programs, and court-based interventions. In addition to noting jurisdictions with promising practices, the brief discusses how locations can fund detention alternatives.
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Bill Summary: The Runaway and Homeless Youth and Trafficking Prevention Act

Author:National Network for Youth

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:A summary of the main proposals in the Runaway and+

Homeless Youth and Trafficking Prevention Act reintroduced in the Senate on 27 January 2015 to reauthorize the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (RHYA) (42 U.S.C. 5701 et seq.). The bill expands the definition of “human trafficking” used in RHYA to extend coverage to more vulnerable youth than it currently does; reauthorizes federal funding for three community-based programs that help youth obtain housing, education and job training; establishes support and services at the national level; and necessitates data collection and performance monitoring for greater accountability and evidence-based measures going forward.  
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Juvenile Court Statistics 2011

Author:Sarah Hockenberry, Charles Puzzanchera

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This report was developed by the National Center for Juvenile+

Justice (NCJJ) and captures juvenile delinquency and juvenile status offense cases petitioned to juvenile court in 2011.
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Learning Difficulties in Adolescent Clients of a Shelter for Runaway and Homeless Street Youths

Author:Melanie A. Barwick and Linda S. Siegel

  • Year of Publication:
  • 1996

Abstract:This article discusses the results of a study on the+

prevalence of reading and arithmetic difficulties in youth ages 16-21 in a shelter for runaway and homeless street youth. This shelter provides various services for youth in this age range, including access to computers and correspondence course assistance, but the findings of this study make it clear that shelters must provide more in-depth and thorough education and training programs for youth to help them become self-sufficient when they leave. The study found that over half of those observed experienced significant reading difficulties, while over a quarter experienced significant arithmetic difficulties. The authors of this study thus recommend that shelter services have a more integrative approach that would include programs addressing cognitive and learning needs.
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A Novel, Intensive Home Visiting Intervention for Runaway, Sexually Exploited Girls

Author:Laurel D. Edinburgh and Elizabeth M. Saewyc

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2009

Abstract:This study outlines a home-visiting intervention, the Runaway Intervention Program+

(RIP), initiated in 2003 for runaway girls aged 10-14 who had experienced sexual assault. Integral to this program were advanced practice nurses (APNs), who provided home and school visits as well as case management.  The girls also had access to a therapeutic empowerment group and immediate health care and instruction through the program. The program focused on fostering resilience by helping to reconnect the girls to their schools and other supportive environments, and goals for the girls included no longer running away, regular school attendance, and improved health-related decision-making. The study concludes that such community-based and client-focused interventions are often very effective at reducing risk behaviors and addressing the complex health needs of vulnerable runaway youth.
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Runaway/Thrownaway Children: National Estimates and Characteristics

Author:Heather Hammer, David Finkelhor, and Andrea J. Sedlak

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2002

Abstract:This report provides a compilation of findings from the Second+

National Incidence Studies of Missing, Abducted, Runaway, and Thrownaway Children (NISMART-2) spanning 1997-1999 to better understand how many children become missing every year and why. The report focuses on both runaway and thrownaway youth – those who have been kicked out by their caretakers – because the distinction between the two is not always clear and many youth experience both types of situations with significant overlap. Most runaway/thrownaway youth are between the ages of 15 and 17, and many previously experienced physical or sexual abuse at home. However, many also interact with dangerous company while away from home and thus are in greatest need of specialized assistance that includes social service and mental health responses.
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“Ungovernable” and Runaway Youth: Guidance for Youth-Serving, Legal and Judicial Professionals

Author:Coalition for Juvenile Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This article provides policy guidance regarding runaway and ungovernability cases,+

the rates for which are much higher for African American youth and girls. The article specifically cites the Coalition for Juvenile Justice's National Standards for the Care of Youth Charged with Status Offenses -- also available in this library -- and its recommendations for how policymakers, first responders, and law enforcement professionals should respond to these types of status offense cases. Additionally, the article highlights a court-based reform effort in Jefferson County, Alabama that succeeded in significantly decreasing the number of status offense cases filed before the court annually.
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Runaway Youth: A Research Brief

Author:Sydney McKinney

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:Running away is a status offense in 39 states. While+

the exact number of youth who run away from home each year is unknown, evidence suggests that most return home within a few days. This research brief summarizes empirical literature on this issue from the last 20 years, highlighting reasons why young people run away from home, risk and protective factors, and what is known about interventions aimed at this vulnerable population.
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Powerpoint presentation from SORC webinar “Why Families Matter: Engaging Families for Better Outcomes”

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This is the powerpoint presentation from SORC’s webinar Why Families+

Matter: Engaging Families for Better Outcomes, that was hosted on April 7, 2014. This webinar provides an overview of the importance of partnering with young people and family members in developing community-based responses to status offenses. Panelists share their knowledge of engaging families, both in reform conversations and in the development of individual case plans. Panelists included Ryan Shanahan (Senior Program Associate, Vera Institute of Justice's Family Justice Program), Grace Bauer (Director, Justice for Families) and Jennifer Gunnell (Director of Social Services LGBTQ Program, SCO Family of Services).
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