Measuring Success: A Guide to Becoming an Evidence-Based Practice

By

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

Increasingly, community-based juvenile justice practitioners are required to validate that they are engaging in evidence-based practice—proof that they are delivering the services their clients require and that the program yields the desired outcomes for youth in their care. While this expectation is a good one, many practitioners understandably feel overwhelmed as they contemplate the task. […]

From Child Welfare to Juvenile Justice: Race, Gender, and System Experiences

By

Friday, September 5th, 2014

This article looks at which youth are most likely to become involved with the juvenile justice system by examining a young person’s previous experiences with child welfare and mental health and substance abuse service receipt. The sample analyzed includes over 42,000 individuals born between 1985 and 1994 who were placed in out-of-home care and/or whose families […]

Pathways Through the Juvenile Justice System: Predictors of Formal Disposition

By

Friday, September 5th, 2014

This study examines case-management system data from a large southern state and compares the influence of extra-legal and legal factors on case disposition. The authors consulted over 8,000 cases of youth aged 10-12 referred to a juvenile probation department for at least one offense between 2001 and 2002. The findings suggest that extra-legal factors are significant […]

Girls, Status Offenses and the Need for a Less Punitive and More Empowering Approach

By

Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

The Coalition for Juvenile Justice (CJJ) published this brief as part of The SOS project, which engages with states to establish policies that divert non-delinquent youth from the court system and instead use more effective community-based systems of care. A disproportionate number of status offense cases is brought against girls, especially girls of color, and […]

Use of the Valid Court Order: State by State Comparisons

By

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

This publication gives a snapshot of how states compare in their use of the valid court order (VCO) exception that can allow youth to be placed in locked detention for status offenses.

Washington State’s Models for Change Truancy Interventions: A Cost-Benefit Analysis

By

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

This report presents preliminary findings from a cost-benefit analysis of Models for Change (MFC) Truancy Interventions in Washington State. Early results suggest that these programs not only improve student attendance but also reduce costs associated with school drop out.

No Child Left Behind? Representing Youth and Families in Truancy Matters

By

Thursday, March 13th, 2014

This article highlights legal issues around truancy cases that go to court and describes the importance of expanding legal services programs for this population and their families.

Clark County Truancy Manual

By

Friday, January 17th, 2014

This manual, an accompanying resource to A Toolkit for Status Offense System Reform, Module Three: Planning and Implementing System Change, documents Clark County’s coordinated, comprehensive approach to truancy. The goal of the county’s truancy program is to use education and support services in a graduated response plan to increase school attendance and substantially reduce the need for the […]

Innovation Brief: The Cultural Enhancement Model for Evidence-Based Practice

By

Tuesday, December 31st, 2013

This innovation brief describes the Cultural Enhancement Model that was developed by the University of Washington Division of Public Behavioral Health & Justice Policy. This model provides guidance to practitioners on how to incorporate culturally-relevant strategies into evidence-based practice to improve both, community and client-level engagement.

Innovation Brief: Using Community Truancy Boards to Tackle Truancy

By

Monday, December 30th, 2013

This innovation brief describes the work of the West Valley Community Truancy Board in Spokane County, WA. This collaborative brings together stakeholders from the community that support youth and families struggling with truancy. This brief highlights the many positive outcomes associated with this approach.