Library Search Results for police

Notes from the Field: Gloucester Township, NJ

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This profile describes the development of Gloucester Township Police Department's network of community-based+

responses to youth delinquency and status offenses. The profile includes a summary of the county’s planning process, an overview of existing programs, a snapshot of general outcomes, and reflections from those in the reform movement.
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The Effects of Adolescent Development on Policing

Author:International Association of Chiefs of Police

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This brief, authored by the International Association of Chiefs+

of Police, provides an overview of adolescent brain development and its effects on law enforcement interactions with youth. The brief outlines ten strategies for law enforcement to apply an understanding of adolescent brain development during youth interactions, noting important considerations for integrating this knowledge into everyday practices, procedures, and programs. It also includes examples of law enforcement agencies with existing emphases on positive youth development.
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Scared Smart or Bored Straight? Testing Deterrence Logic in an Evaluation of Police-led Truancy Intervention

Author:Gordon Bazemore, Jeanne B. Stinchcomb, and Leslie A. Leip

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2004

Abstract:This paper provides an evaluation of a truancy intervention effort+

in a southeastern county in the U.S. The initiative was a collaboration between the local sheriff's department, social service agencies, the prosecutor's office, and the school board, and called for officers to take truant students to a central Truancy Unit and for social service professionals to make referrals to appropriate services. The data indicate that this  truancy intervention had no impact on future delinquency, and although it may have improved attendance rates in the short-term, the program might have done more harm than good in the long run. The authors conclude that deterrence-focused intervention strategies that are operated using a centralized approach have little positive value in the long-term.      
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Gender Matters: Patterns in Girls’ Delinquency and Gender Responsive Programming

Author:Meda Chesney-Lind and Scott K. Okamoto

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2001

Abstract:The authors of this article argue that because girls’ aggression+

and violence have historically been ignored or denied, changing arrest rates for girls for certain violent offenses is more a reflection of changing police practices than of changes in girls’ behaviors. Policing of girls has increased over the past few decades, and their arrests for non-traditional and status offenses are among those with the greatest increases. These girls often report higher rates of victimization and abuse, and aggression usually manifests within the home. The article also discusses the recent trend of relabeling girls’ arguments with parents from status offenses to assaults, resulting in especially high arrest rates for African American girls and women. Finally, the authors review the recent literature on promising interventions for girls.
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Who Do You Refer? The Effects of a Policy Change on Juvenile Referrals

Author:John D. McCluskey, Sean P. Varano, Beth M. Huebner, and Timothy S. Bynum

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2004

Abstract:This article examines the effects of limiting police discretion in+

making court referrals on the juvenile population that is introduced to the justice system. The research presented in the article surrounds a 1994 policy reform in a midsized Midwestern police department that, after 1994, pushed its officers to regularly make referrals to the county family court upon arresting juveniles. The study found that girls – particularly minority females – face increased exposure to formal processing after policy changes, and a widening of the net at the referral decision point for first-time juvenile arrestees occurs after such a change. Additionally, younger arrestees and juveniles arrested for less serious offenses were more likely to be referred to family court after 1994. This article thus demonstrates the potential dangers involved in police-initiated policy changes and the importance of acknowledging the occurrence of such changes when analyzing trends in juvenile arrests and referrals.
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