Library Search Results for New York City - NY

Families with Service Needs Advisory Board Report to the Connecticut General Assembly

Author:FWSN Advisory Board

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2008

Abstract:This report is the product of the FWSN Advisory Board's year+

long planning process to develop a framework for service delivery that diverts children from the court process. The report provides a detailed population profile of youth involved in the FWSN system. It then describes accomplishments and gaps in services, lessons learned from national models, and recommendations related to FWSN youth and their families. The final section of the report pertains to girls in the juvenile justice system.
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The Family Assessment Program: Trajectories and Effects

Author:Vera Institute of Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2007

Abstract:Following up on a 2005 Vera report about New York+

City's Family Assessment Program (FAP), Vera conducted an exploratory study for the Administration for Children's Services, interviewing 100 families who had approached FAP offices in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens between March and September in 2006. Researchers interviewed 75 of those families again after three months. Our investigation suggests that FAP is helping families served. Many of the young people interviewed received prompt referrals to services and showed signs of improved mental health and better family relations three months after approaching FAP.
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Changing the PINS System in New York:A Study of the Implications of Raising the Age Limit for Persons in Need of Supervision (PINS)

Author:Vera Institute of Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2001

Abstract:This study is an accompanying resource to A Toolkit for+

Status Offense System Reform, Module Two: Using Local Information to Guide System Change. It was conducted in 2001, before the implementation of a bill that raised the Persons in Need of Supervision (PINS) age in New York State to 18. It examined the strengths and weaknesses of the previous system and provided the first comprehensive projections of how many more children would enter under the new law. While the scope of this report differs from the analysis you may be conducting as part of your system assessment work, reviewing it may be of use to you as you consider different ways to analyze and present information to your working group.
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Juvenile Status Offenses:Treatment and Early Intervention

Author:Jessica R. Kendall, American Bar Association (ABA) Center on Children & the Law

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2007

Abstract:This article gives and overview of status offense issues. It+

describes some of the underlying causes behind status offense behaviors and describes how this population has been treated historically. It argues for family and community based responses to these behaviors and gives examples of existing models that are centered around these concepts.
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A Study of New York City’s Family Assessment Program

Author:Vera Institute of Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2005

Abstract:This report summarizes the findings of Vera's study on New+

York City's Family Assessment Program that supports Persons in Need of Supervision (PINS). Vera’s investigation reveals that the city is reaping significant benefits: families are receiving assistance more immediately; probation intakes have dropped by more than 80 percent; court referrals are down by more than half as youth are being informally connected to services without the need for a family court order; and out-of-home remands and placements for youth who are status offenders (called Persons in Need of Supervision in New York) have been reduced by more than 20 percent. And all of this has occurred while the number of youth eligible for PINS services has increased.
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The family assessment program: trajectories and effects

Author:Roohi Choudhry

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2007

Abstract:In 2005, the Vera Institute of Justice conducted a preliminary+

analysis of New York City's Family Assessment Program (FAP) to assess the impact of FAP on the Person in Need of Services (PINS) system. Shortly after the implementation of FAP, Vera found an 80% reduction in probation PINS intake cases, reductions in petitioned PINS cases to family court by 50%, and declines by 20% of youth in the PINS system being placed out of home. The publication also aims to address the efficacy of the FAP and its impact on families in the PINS system as a whole.
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Characteristics and Mental Health of Homeless Adolescents: Age and Gender Differences

Author:Ana Mari Cauce, Matthew Paradise, Joshua Aaron Ginzler, Lara Embry, Charles Morgan, Yvette Lohr, and Jim Theofelis

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2000

Abstract:After interviewing 364 homeless youth about their experiences while being+

homeless, researchers found that these youth came from challenging backgrounds and with higher rates of mental health challenges. Over half of youth reported that their mothers had substance use problems which increased with age and 52 percent of youth reported that their father also had substance abuse challenges throughout their childhood. Alcohol was the most commonly used substance among these youth, after marijuana and other more serious drugs. Males (67 percent) and females (55 percent) were somewhat similar in their habits of substance use habits.
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Notes from the Field: New York City, NY

Author:Vera Institute of Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2013

Abstract:This profile documents New York City's efforts to strengthen its+

community-based status offense system by launching a new intake process, screening and assessment tool, and continuum of services. The profile includes a summary of the city's planning process, an overview of monitoring strategies, a snapshot of general program outcomes, and reflections from those in the reform movement.
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Changing the Status Quo for Status Offenders: New York State’s Efforts to Support Troubled Teens

Author:Tina Chiu andSara Mogulescu, Vera Institute of Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2004

Abstract:Between 2001 and 2004, child welfare and probation leaders in+

New York State undertook an effort to transform the state's status offender system to provide timely support to troubled teens and their families in their communities and rely less on courts, law enforcement, and detention. This Issue in Brief examines how this dramatic shift helped guide disobedient, but not delinquent, children back on track while yielding significant cost savings. Jurisdictions looking to better serve their own status offender populations will find useful models in this report's summary of the lessons learned in New York State.
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