Library Search Results for New York

Notes from the Field: Onondaga County, NY

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This profile describes the status offense reform effort in Onondaga County,+

NY that has led to a drop in PINS referrals and placement for status offenses. This success can be attributed to local school-based interventions, community-based services and parent education efforts. Download this resource to learn more about the process that led to these changes.
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Lousiana Models for Change Target Population

Author:Louisiana Models for Change

  • Year of Publication:

Abstract:This document is an accompanying resource to A Toolkit for+

Status Offense System Reform, Module Three: Planning and Implementing System Change. It gives an overview of best practice approaches to developing a target population as well as some descriptive information of Louisiana innovations. While specific to Louisiana, it offers a framework that may be of use to other jurisdictions.
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Orange County PINS PowerPoint Presentation

Author:Orange County Department of Social Services

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2010

Abstract:This PowerPoint presentation by Orange County's Department of Social Services+

offers a snapshot of its community-based PINS system. It includes data on PINS cases and a process flow chart. It also includes information on the county's performance-based contracting system, services for PINS youth, the importance of standardized assessments, and placement data and costs.
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Orange County Department of Social Services 2012 Annual Report

Author:Orange County Department of Social Services

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2012

Abstract:Orange County's Department of Social Services diverts status offending youth+

(or PINS) from the juvenile justice system by referring eligible youth and families to the Family Keys Program, a non-profit entity contracted by the county since 2003. This annual report includes information on the county's PINS system, including data on youth served and their outcomes.
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What Do I Do Now?

Author:Onondaga County Department of Probation

  • Year of Publication:

Abstract:This is a resource guide for parents experiencing problems with+

their children produced by the Onondaga County Department of Probation. It is intended to help them know how and where to begin to look for help. It discusses some of the underlying reasons for behavior problems and then offers numerous county-based resources.
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Persons in Need of Supervision Report 2012: Orange County, NY

Author:Orange County, NY

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2012

Abstract:This PowerPoint presentation is an accompanying resource to A Toolkit+

for Status Offense System Reform, Module Two: Using Local Information to Guide System Change. This is a presentation of PINS (Persons in Need of Supervision) data from Orange County, New York in 2012. It includes information on the demographics of young people referred for PINS as well as information on referral sources. Although your system assessment presentation will be broader in scope, you may want to review these slides for an example of how to visually present data findings in a clear manner.
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A Generation Later: What We’ve Learned about Zero Tolerance in Schools

Author:Jacob Kang-Brown et al.

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2013

Abstract:This report from Vera's Center on Youth Justice draws on+

empirical research to assess how zero tolerance policies impact individual students and school climate, create a school-to-prison pipeline, and if there are more effective alternatives to zero tolerance policies.
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From Courts to Communities: The Right Response to Truancy, Running Away, and Other Status Offenses

Author:Annie Salsich and Jennifer Trone

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2013

Abstract:This white paper aims to raise awareness about status offenses and+

spur conversations about how to effectively handle these cases by citing several promising examples of state and local reform. The white paper discusses the status of status offenses in America, explains why courts are poorly suited to handle status offense cases, describes the hallmarks of an effective community-based response for young people charged with status offenses, provides evidence that community-based responses work well, and then concludes by explaining how the Status Offense Reform Center (SORC) can help states and localities develop effective community-based responses to young people who commit status offenses.
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Truancy Reduction Demonstration Projects 1999 to Present

Author:Reduction Initiative Sites and National Center for School Engagement

  • Year of Publication:

Abstract:This report gives an overview of the Office of Juvenile+

Justice and Delinquency Prevention's Truancy Reduction Demonstration Projects. Efforts in Rodeo, CA, Jacksonville, FL, Yaphank, NY, Houston, TX, Seattle, WA and Tacoma, WA are discussed here, demonstrating the range of possible interventions.
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A Study of New York City’s Family Assessment Program

Author:Vera Institute of Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2005

Abstract:This report summarizes the findings of Vera's study on New+

York City's Family Assessment Program that supports Persons in Need of Supervision (PINS). Vera’s investigation reveals that the city is reaping significant benefits: families are receiving assistance more immediately; probation intakes have dropped by more than 80 percent; court referrals are down by more than half as youth are being informally connected to services without the need for a family court order; and out-of-home remands and placements for youth who are status offenders (called Persons in Need of Supervision in New York) have been reduced by more than 20 percent. And all of this has occurred while the number of youth eligible for PINS services has increased.
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