Library Search Results for mental health

From Child Welfare to Juvenile Justice: Race, Gender, and System Experiences

Author:Sara Goodkind, Jeffrey J. Shook, Kevin H. Kim, Ryan T. Pohlig, and David J. Herring

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2013

Abstract:This article looks at which youth are most likely to+

become involved with the juvenile justice system by examining a young person's previous experiences with child welfare and mental health and substance abuse service receipt. The sample analyzed includes over 42,000 individuals born between 1985 and 1994 who were placed in out-of-home care and/or whose families received in-home services from the child welfare system in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania. African American males were most likely to have juvenile justice system involvement, as were youth whose child welfare cases were open when they were adolescents. The authors emphasize the necessity of communication between the juvenile justice and child welfare systems in order for a youth's particular case to be fully understood and addressed.
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Trends in State Courts 2014

Author:National Center for State Courts

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:The 2014 edition of Trends in State Courts is a+

collection of articles focusing on what courts can do and are doing for youth, as well as on various juvenile justice reforms that have been implemented across the country. One featured article, found on page 17 and titled "Keeping Kids Out of Court: Rapides Parish's Response to Status Offenses," discusses the status offense reform effort that Rapides Parish in Louisiana has undertaken, while "Dependency and Delinquency in SYNC," found on page 7, highlights an initiative in Newton County, Georgia for dual status youth. Other areas of focus include the overlap between mental health and juvenile justice (page 21), as well as the prevalence of disproportionate minority contact in the juvenile justice system (page 27).
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Guidelines for Instructing Youth Prior to Administration of a Mental Health Screening Tool

Author:Valerie Williams and Thomas Grisso

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2009

Abstract:This document is an accompanying resource to A Toolkit for+

Status Offense System Reform, Module Three: Planning and Implementing System Change. It was created to assist juvenile justice personnel when introducing youth to a mental health screening tool as part of an intake process. These guidelines were developed by the Juvenile Detention Centers Association of Pennsylvania (JDCAP) with the assistance of the National Youth Screening & Assessment Project (NYSAP), for settings using the Massachusetts Youth Screening Instrument-Second Version (MAYSI-2). Although it refers to the MAYSI-2, the guidelines may be helpful to jurisdictions using other other mental health screening tools as well.
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Innovation Brief: Schools Turn to Treatment, Not Punishment, for Children with Mental Health Needs

Author:Giudi Weiss, Kathleen Skowyra

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2013

Abstract:This innovation brief sheds light on how Ohio and Connecticut+

developed, and were able to sustain, school-based diversion models to identify and support students with mental health needs who are at risk of referral to juvenile court or probation.
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King County Resource Guide for Information Sharing – 2nd Edition

Author:Uniting for Youth

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2009

Abstract:This guide was designed for staff in King County, Washington+

to help improve communication between the various agencies that deal with young people. It provides a better understanding of what information may be shared by participants in juvenile dependency, juvenile justice, education, mental health, and substance abuse treatment systems for the purposes of collaboration and problem-solving. It highlights that in some circumstances, Washington law and federal law actually allow and support the exchange of information between systems much more readily than is generally understood.
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The Family Assessment Program: Trajectories and Effects

Author:Vera Institute of Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2007

Abstract:Following up on a 2005 Vera report about New York+

City's Family Assessment Program (FAP), Vera conducted an exploratory study for the Administration for Children's Services, interviewing 100 families who had approached FAP offices in the Bronx, Brooklyn, and Queens between March and September in 2006. Researchers interviewed 75 of those families again after three months. Our investigation suggests that FAP is helping families served. Many of the young people interviewed received prompt referrals to services and showed signs of improved mental health and better family relations three months after approaching FAP.
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What Works for Female Children and Adolescents: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Programs and Interventions

Author:Kelly Bell, Mary A. Terzian, Kristin A. Moore

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2012

Abstract:This research brief uses the findings of 106 evaluations of+

social interventions to identify which approaches worked - and didn't work - in improving female child and adolescent outcomes in nine outcome areas, including academic achievement and delinquency. The research brief indicates that 51 out of the 106 programs had a positive effect on at least one of the outcomes reviewed, but none of the programs worked across all outcome areas. In addition, the authors found that none of the mentoring or school-based programs reviewed had a positive impact on female delinquent behaviors.
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Running Away From Home: A Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Risk Factors and Young Adult Outcomes

Author:Joan Tucker et al.

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2011

Abstract:

This study examines risk factors and health-related outcomes associated with+

running away. The authors found that relationships with parents, school engagement, depressive symptoms and substance use were related to running away from home. Additionally, they found that over the long term youth who ran away had higher levels of depression and substance abuse compared to young people who had not left home. The authors conclude that substance use and depression are important factors to consider when designing preventative programs and treatments for runaway youth.

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Predictors of severity of absenteeism in children with anxiety-based school refusal.

Author:Cheri Hansen et al.

  • Year of Publication:
  • 1998

Abstract:Relations between sociodemographic, clinical, and familial factors and truancy were+

analyzed among children with anxiety-based school refusal. Authors found that older youth, lower levels of fear and less involved families were the main predictors of higher rates of absenteeism.
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Forms and functions of school refusal behavior in youth: an empirical analysis of absenteeism severity

Author:Christopher Kearney

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2007

Abstract:Sampling 200 youth 5 to 17 years olds and their+

parents, the aim of this study was to examine if a functional model of school refusal was effective at predicting school absenteeism. Finding indicated that function was a better predictor of truancy and behavior.  
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