Library Search Results for girls

Notes from the Field: Newton County, GA

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This profile describes the development of the Truancy Intervention Board in+

Newton County, GA. This Board aims to divert youth away from the formal court process by addressing problems of truancy and educational neglect outside the courtroom, with the support of invested community stakeholders. The profile includes a summary of the county’s planning process, an overview of monitoring strategies, a snapshot of general program outcomes, and reflections from those in the reform movement.
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Improving the Juvenile Justice System for Girls: Lessons from the States

Author:Liz Watson and Peter Edelman

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2012

Abstract:This report examines the challenges facing girls in the juvenile+

justice system and makes recommendations for gender-responsive reforms at the local, state and federal levels. Research suggests that technical violations and status offenses account for 25 percent of boys' detentions, but 41 percent of girls', a reflection of a system that punishes girls disproportionately. In an effort to address these types of issues, the report reviews literature documenting girls' particular pathways into the juvenile justice system, briefly describes the recent history of gender-responsive, trauma-informed efforts, and includes detailed case studies of reform efforts in Connecticut, Florida, and California.
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Differences in Risk Factors and Adjustment for Male and Female Delinquents in Treatment Foster Care

Author:Patricia Chamberlain, Ph.D., and John B. Reid, Ph.D.

  • Year of Publication:
  • 1994

Abstract:This study examines a sample of 88 adolescents, 51 of+

whom are male, placed in Treatment Foster Care (TFC), in which these youth were placed in community homes with parents who had been trained and were supervised in the implementation of a social learning-based treatment program. The study looks closely at the psychological, behavioral, and management issues that delinquent boys and girls each present while in TFC, as well as the effectiveness of this treatment for boys and girls. The authors found that females presented less aggressive behavior during the first month of treatment, but that their behavior became much more aggressive by the sixth month. The authors argue that girls have been short-changed by service delivery systems, as they are significantly less likely than males to receive services. The data suggests that females require more than six months of treatment in order for it to be effective.
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All Ellas: Girls Locked Up

Author:Bernardine Dohrn

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2004

Abstract:This article examines the four recent major shifts involving incarcerated+

girls: the spike in incarceration of girls; the increase in girls' arrests for aggravated assault; the high percentage of African American girls among the arrests and incarcerations; and the use of private institutions for detaining girls. The article analyzes which girls are incarcerated and which offenses lead to this incarceration, as well as the fact that girls -- especially white girls -- are far more likely to be detained in private institutions. Finally, the author lays out ten steps that can be taken to improve and reduce girls' contact with the juvenile justice system and argues that it is essential to listen to the voices of girls who have been imprisoned for status offenses in identifying which strategies are most effective. Participation by girls themselves is particularly important in avoiding essentialist understandings of what is appropriate programming for girls.
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Gender Bias and Juvenile Justice Revisited: A Multiyear Analysis

Author:John M. MacDonald and Meda Chesney-Lind

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2001

Abstract:This study analyzes 12 years of data from juvenile cases+

referred to the Hawaii Family Court, with the aim of determining the degree to which gender bias – as well as ethnicity and geographic location – plays a role in how juveniles are treated in court. The sample studied consists of 85,692 cases referred to the Hawaiian Family Court, 30% of which concerned female juvenile offenders and 35% of which concerned youth of Hawaiian ancestry. The authors find that gender has little impact on decisions made at early points of court handling, such as petitioning and adjudication, but that girls are likely to be more harshly punished than boys once they get past this stage. These girls thus experience “partial justice,” or a double standard within the juvenile justice system, and there is a need for gender-specific programming that is focused on empowering girls rather than revictimizing them.
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Gender Matters: Patterns in Girls’ Delinquency and Gender Responsive Programming

Author:Meda Chesney-Lind and Scott K. Okamoto

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2001

Abstract:The authors of this article argue that because girls’ aggression+

and violence have historically been ignored or denied, changing arrest rates for girls for certain violent offenses is more a reflection of changing police practices than of changes in girls’ behaviors. Policing of girls has increased over the past few decades, and their arrests for non-traditional and status offenses are among those with the greatest increases. These girls often report higher rates of victimization and abuse, and aggression usually manifests within the home. The article also discusses the recent trend of relabeling girls’ arguments with parents from status offenses to assaults, resulting in especially high arrest rates for African American girls and women. Finally, the authors review the recent literature on promising interventions for girls.
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Gender and Status Offending: Judicial Paternalism in Juvenile Justice Processing

Author:Andrew L. Spivak, Brooke M. Wagner, Jennifer M. Whitmer, and Courtney L. Charish

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This study discusses the intersection between gender and juvenile justice+

processing outcomes with regard to alleged status offenders. The authors point to judicial paternalism as the reason for the differential treatment of delinquent girls, and the effect is particularly prevalent among status offense cases as these are meant to enforce institutional authority. The study uses juvenile processing data from 1999-2001 for over 3,000 status offense referrals to the Oklahoma Office of Juvenile Affairs, and the authors argue that the juvenile justice system is a gendered institution in which the adjudication of status offenders most clearly demonstrates the role of judicial paternalism.
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Depression Triples between the Ages of 12 and 15 among Adolescent Girls

Author:Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2012

Abstract:This Data Spotlight from the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics+

and Quality examines the prevalence of depression among adolescent girls, which increases with the onset of puberty. Nearly three times as many adolescent girls experience a major depressive episode (MDE) than their male peers, and the percentage of girls who experienced an MDE increased threefold between the ages of 12 and 15. This data sheet recommends that prevention and intervention efforts for adolescent girls ought to begin in middle school in order to help reduce depression rates in this population.
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Who Do You Refer? The Effects of a Policy Change on Juvenile Referrals

Author:John D. McCluskey, Sean P. Varano, Beth M. Huebner, and Timothy S. Bynum

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2004

Abstract:This article examines the effects of limiting police discretion in+

making court referrals on the juvenile population that is introduced to the justice system. The research presented in the article surrounds a 1994 policy reform in a midsized Midwestern police department that, after 1994, pushed its officers to regularly make referrals to the county family court upon arresting juveniles. The study found that girls – particularly minority females – face increased exposure to formal processing after policy changes, and a widening of the net at the referral decision point for first-time juvenile arrestees occurs after such a change. Additionally, younger arrestees and juveniles arrested for less serious offenses were more likely to be referred to family court after 1994. This article thus demonstrates the potential dangers involved in police-initiated policy changes and the importance of acknowledging the occurrence of such changes when analyzing trends in juvenile arrests and referrals.
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Improving Juvenile Justice for Females: A Statewide Assessment in California

Author:Barbara Bloom, Barbara Owen, Elizabeth Piper Deschenes, and Jill Rosenbaum

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2002

Abstract:This article outlines the results of surveys of officials from+

several California state agencies as well as interviews and focus groups with girls and professionals serving this population. The purposes of the survey were to compile data on the types of services available to girls aged 10-17 in California’s juvenile justice system and to better understand the barriers to program services – which include the need for funding and the lack of information. The article examines the quality of the few existing gender-specific services for girls in California’s juvenile justice system, as well as the ways in which the state and Office of Criminal Justice Planning (OCJP) can facilitate change that takes into consideration suggestions made by focus group respondents.
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