Library Search Results for community engagement

Notes from the Field: Gloucester Township, NJ

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This profile describes the development of Gloucester Township Police Department's network of community-based+

responses to youth delinquency and status offenses. The profile includes a summary of the county’s planning process, an overview of existing programs, a snapshot of general outcomes, and reflections from those in the reform movement.
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Innovation Brief: The Cultural Enhancement Model for Evidence-Based Practice

Author:Sarah Walker

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2013

Abstract:This innovation brief describes the Cultural Enhancement Model that was+

developed by the University of Washington Division of Public Behavioral Health & Justice Policy. This model provides guidance to practitioners on how to incorporate culturally-relevant strategies into evidence-based practice to improve both, community and client-level engagement.
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21 Ways to Engage Students in School

Author:Gretchen Mann-Erickson and Judith Martinez, NCSE

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2007

Abstract:This publication produced by the National Center for School Engagement+

(NCSE) documents successful and practical asset-based strategies that contribute to school engagement. It also discusses best practices in applying and implementing strategies.
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10 Things a School Can Do to Improve Attendance

Author:Colorado Foundation for Families and Children

  • Year of Publication:

Abstract:This publication produced by the Colorado Foundation for Families and+

Children suggests 10 things a school can do to improve attendance.
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The School to Prison Pipeline

Author:Reclaiming Futures

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2011

Abstract:In this webinar, Judge Steven Teske shares the strategies used+

in Clayton County, Georgia to work with the local school district to reduce referrals to juvenile courts while simultaneously developing school-based strategies to address disruptive behavior. This collaborative arrangement has reduced serious juvenile crime both at school and in the community while increasing graduation rates. Judge Teske also shares the importance of making this a community effort by reaching out both to the local media and civic groups to educate them on the effects of school referrals to juvenile courts and the importance of developing strategies in the best interest of our youth.
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