Library Search Results for community-based

Tackling Truancy (Infographic)

Author:Mahsa Jafarian

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This infographic outlines the impacts and causes of truancy at+

the student, family, school, and community-level. It discusses why punitive and court based approaches are inappropriate and presents promising practices, highlighting some jurisdictions that have implemented such strategies.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE
  • Resource Topics:

Notes from the Field: Gloucester Township, NJ

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This profile describes the development of Gloucester Township Police Department's network of community-based+

responses to youth delinquency and status offenses. The profile includes a summary of the county’s planning process, an overview of existing programs, a snapshot of general outcomes, and reflections from those in the reform movement.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE

Notes from the Field: Newton County, GA

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2015

Abstract:This profile describes the development of the Truancy Intervention Board in+

Newton County, GA. This Board aims to divert youth away from the formal court process by addressing problems of truancy and educational neglect outside the courtroom, with the support of invested community stakeholders. The profile includes a summary of the county’s planning process, an overview of monitoring strategies, a snapshot of general program outcomes, and reflections from those in the reform movement.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE

Notes from the field: Illinois

Author:Vera Institute of Justice

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This profile describes the process that led to the development+

of the Comprehensive Community-Based Youth Services (CCBYS) system, a statewide network of 33 community-based youth service providers in Illinois that responds to status offense behaviors. CCBYS providers ensure that there is an immediate response upon referral, and that youth are connected to appropriate services without court involvement, with excellent results.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE

Keeping kids out of court: Rethinking our response to status offenses

Author:Insiyah Mohammad

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:Status offenses are behaviors that are problematic but non-criminal in+

nature —such as running away from home, skipping school, or violating curfew—which are prohibited under the law only because of an individual’s status as a minor. Thousands of kids are funneled into the court system every year on status offense charges, an approach that is increasingly proving to be inefficient, expensive, and ineffective in addressing the underlying causes of these behaviors. This brief describes the scope of this problem, highlights states that are rethinking the current approach, and provides recommendations for better supporting youth and families who are struggling with status offenses outside of the juvenile justice system.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE

Powerpoint presentation from SORC webinar: Using Restorative Practices in Response to Status Offense Behaviors

Author:Status Offense Reform Center

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2014

Abstract:This is the powerpoint presentation from SORC’s webinar Using Restorative+

Practices in Response to Status Offense Behaviors, that was hosted on August 27, 2014. Presenters discussed the value of talking circles as a community-focused diversion option for youth, how to implement restorative practices in schools, and how to create sustainable relationships with the courts and law enforcement officials. Presenters included Sydney McKinney, Vera Institute of Justice; Tom Cavanagh, Restorative Justice Education; and Monika Audette, Barron County Restorative Justice Programs.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE

Innovation Brief: The Cultural Enhancement Model for Evidence-Based Practice

Author:Sarah Walker

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2013

Abstract:This innovation brief describes the Cultural Enhancement Model that was+

developed by the University of Washington Division of Public Behavioral Health & Justice Policy. This model provides guidance to practitioners on how to incorporate culturally-relevant strategies into evidence-based practice to improve both, community and client-level engagement.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE

Innovation Brief: Using Community Truancy Boards to Tackle Truancy

Author:Bonnie Bush

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2013

Abstract:This innovation brief describes the work of the West Valley+

Community Truancy Board in Spokane County, WA. This collaborative brings together stakeholders from the community that support youth and families struggling with truancy. This brief highlights the many positive outcomes associated with this approach.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE

Orange County Department of Social Services 2012 Annual Report

Author:Orange County Department of Social Services

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2012

Abstract:Orange County's Department of Social Services diverts status offending youth+

(or PINS) from the juvenile justice system by referring eligible youth and families to the Family Keys Program, a non-profit entity contracted by the county since 2003. This annual report includes information on the county's PINS system, including data on youth served and their outcomes.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE

Florida Network Policy and Procedure Manual

Author:

  • Year of Publication:
  • 2010

Abstract:The Florida Network, a statewide network of non-profit providers, offers+

a continuum of services to status offending youth (CINS/FINS) to divert them from the juvenile justice and child welfare systems, and to maximize their strengths. This policy and procedure manual is an accompanying resource to A Toolkit for Status Offense System Reform, Module Three: Planning and Implementing System change as it provides information on the history of the network, intake and screening procedures, admission processes, services, and data collection/quality assurance measures.
FULL ABSTRACT URL VIEW EXTERNAL RESOURCE