• Our new infographic can help you spread awareness about status offenses and build consensus among stakeholders in your community.

    New Infographic on Status Offenses!

    Our new infographic can help you spread awareness about status offenses and build consensus among stakeholders in your community.

  • Status offenses are behaviors that are prohibited under law only because of an individual’s status as a minor, including running away from home, skipping school, violating a curfew, drinking under age, and acting “incorrigibly.”  They are problematic, but noncriminal in nature. Learn more here. 

    What is a status offense?

    Status offenses are behaviors that are prohibited under law only because of an individual’s status as a minor, including running away from home, skipping school, violating a curfew, drinking under age, and acting “incorrigibly.”  They are problematic, but noncriminal in nature. Learn more here. 

  • In 2010, young people in nearly 50,000 cases were taken to court for truancy. Learn what the research has to say about truancy and other status offense behaviors.

    Every day, too many kids are funneled into the juvenile justice system for skipping school.

    In 2010, young people in nearly 50,000 cases were taken to court for truancy. Learn what the research has to say about truancy and other status offense behaviors.

  • Increasingly, states and localities are successfully connecting struggling families with social services in their communities, instead of turning to courts. Learn how jurisdictions are transforming their systems.

    Community-based responses to status offenses work.

    Increasingly, states and localities are successfully connecting struggling families with social services in their communities, instead of turning to courts. Learn how jurisdictions are transforming their systems.

  • Check out A Toolkit for Status Offense System Reform, which offers guidance and tools to help you create a community-based approach for responding to and serving youth charged with status offenses. Access the toolkit here.

    Interested in reforming your status offense system?

    Check out A Toolkit for Status Offense System Reform, which offers guidance and tools to help you create a community-based approach for responding to and serving youth charged with status offensesAccess the toolkit here.

Our Mission

The Status Offense Reform Center (SORC) offers resources and tools to policymakers and practitioners interested in creating effective alternatives to juvenile justice system involvement for youth who commit status offenses—behaviors that are problematic but certainly not criminal in nature.
Serious Hispanic teenager looking out window

Structuring System Change

This module describes how to productively engage stakeholders in a system change effort.

View this Toolkit Module

Using Local Information to Guide System Change

This module describes how to use data to conduct an assessment of your system.

View this Toolkit Module

Planning and Implementing System Change

This module describes how to develop and implement a well-informed plan for system change that can be sustained over the long term.

View this Toolkit Module

Monitoring and Sustaining System Change

This module describes how to monitor, assess, and modify your reform plan following its implementation.

View this Toolkit Module

Featured Library Resources

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Blog

Bipartisan Bill is Critical to Caring for Youth and Families in Crisis

Late last month, Senators Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Susan Collins (R-ME) reintroduced the Runaway and Homeless Youth and Trafficking Prevention Act (S.262) in the Senate to reauthorize the Runaway and Homeless Youth Act (RHYA), which expired in 2013. The first attempt to reauthorize RHYA failed last July. RHYA is the main federal safeguard for more than 1.7 million children nationwide—by the most recent estimate—who run away from home, are neglected and forced to leave their homes, are subjected to human trafficking, or exit the child welfare or juvenile justice system without a support system.

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> 116,000

Status offense cases were petitioned in juvenile court in 2011

Click here for the stats